Thursday, June 9, 2016

United Kingdom Allowing non-White Criminal To Stay While Deporting Law-Abiding Whites



Each morning before dawn reveals the beauty of the Scottish Highlands where they live, Jason and Christy Zielsdorf observe certain routines. 

While Christy heads to the kitchen to knead the bread with which they make the tasty sandwiches they sell in their village shop and cafe, Jason prepares the morning’s lessons for their five home-educated children.

Lately another ritual has been added before they open up the store to welcome the first hiker or angler heading to the banks of the river Spey. It is to see if any unfamiliar cars have pulled up outside.

Each morning before dawn reveals the beauty of the Scottish Highlands where they live, Jason and Christy Zielsdorf observe certain routines. Above, the family in the rural cafe they have invested in 
The Zielsdorfs

They might be the official-looking vehicles used by immigration staff or, perhaps, a police car or two.

For after eight happy and hard-working years in Scotland where they have put down roots, the Zielsdorfs and their children are being thrown out of the country.

Any day now — despite having invested more than £200,000 in a business which they have turned into the thriving hub of community life in Laggan, the beautiful village where the BBC series Monarch of the Glen was set, their lives are poised to be turned upside down. You might wonder what terrible offence they must have committed to have the full force of the law come down on them.

Their crime? They could only afford to employ one full-time member of staff in their cafe, rather than two — a pernickety detail, you might think, but to the Home Office, it is all the justification they need.

So in February the Zielsdorfs were given their marching orders and told they had four months to prove they were not in breach of criteria for a business visa — or sell up and return to their native Canada.

Time is running out. Indeed, by tomorrow Mr Zielsdorf has to submit what Home Office staff casually describe as his ‘exit plan’ — in other words, proof he has purchased (one-way) air tickets.

He cannot. All his money is tied up in the business, which he cannot sell. In the meantime, he has had his driving licence cancelled and has been warned that his bank accounts may be frozen.

Not far away from where the Zielsdorfs’ future well-being hangs by the flimsiest of threads, another hard-working family living in the Highlands have narrowly escaped being deported — for now.

After an 11th-hour appeal, Gregg and Kathryn Brain have been given a 60-day visa extension after arguing that their son Lachlan’s Gaelic education would suffer.

After an 11th-hour appeal, Australians Gregg and Kathryn Brain have been given a 60-day visa extension after arguing that their son Lachlan’s Gaelic education would suffer
The Brains

But the couple’s gratitude is tempered by the fact that they are homeless and unemployed because immigration officials have refused them permission to work.

This means their chances of meeting the visa requirement of a £2,000 maintenance fund untouched in a bank for 90 days are virtually nil.

Nicola Sturgeon took up the cause of the Brain family
Nicola Sturgeon took up the cause of the Brain family
‘It’s Kafka-esque,’ says Mr Brain, who decided to sell up and leave family and friends in Australia after being enticed by an advertising campaign by the Scottish government to bring fresh blood to rural areas crippled by population decline.

Like the Zielsdorfs, they have never received so much as a penny in welfare payments.

‘We thought we were the gold-standard for immigrants,’ he says. ‘Now, because we cannot work we are existing on what’s left of our funds — which will inevitably run out. And that means we won’t meet the maintenance requirements.’
He and his wife’s passports, meanwhile, have been confiscated and will be returned only when they nominate a port of departure.

So far, so crazy. Five hundred miles south of the Highlands, in Westminster Magistrates’ Court, a one-legged Albanian double murderer has been granted legal aid to fight extradition from Britain, even though his wife says he confessed to the killings to her.

Saliman Barci — who now claims he is innocent — is using human rights law to avoid being deported to his homeland, where he has already been convicted of killing two men.
Although he posed as a Kosovan refugee to gain British citizenship, he was allowed to live rent-free in a £560-a-month, four-bedroom housing association home and enjoyed nearly £2,000 a month in benefits — all this while making a small fortune from selling cocaine in London.

What a contrast with the way the Zielsdorfs and the Brains are being treated. They are not Albanian criminals, of course.

Rather, they are kith and kin — Canadians and Australians respectively, citizens of the Commonwealth who not only share a common language and a common heritage with the British but, in the Queen, a common head of state. Brethren who have fought wars at our side, dying for the sake of our defence.

Jason Zielsdorf says: ‘Murderers, rapists, thieves and terrorists can keep their driving licences but someone like me, whose intentions are entirely honourable to build something for my family, cannot.’

Something, somewhere in Britain’s immigration policy is terribly wrong. While Barci and other murderous thugs are handed endless sums in legal aid to mount costly Home Office appeals, the Zielsdorfs and the Brains are not.

It is not just Saliman Barci. The cases come as it emerges that Kent has become a new gateway for people-traffickers smuggling migrants across the Channel — potentially opening up more legal challenges to our overstretched courts.

Saliman Barci (pictured above) — who now claims he is innocent — is using human rights law to avoid being deported to his homeland, where he has already been convicted of killing two men
Saliman Barci (pictured above) — who now claims he is innocent — is using human rights law to avoid being deported to his homeland, where he has already been convicted of killing two men.  Although he posed as a Kosovan refugee to gain British citizenship, Barci was allowed to live rent-free in a £560-a-month, four-bedroom housing association home and enjoyed nearly £2,000 a month in benefits

Already, five of the 18 Albanians picked up and brought ashore in Dymchurch when their boat began to sink have applied for asylum.

Then there is the case of Al Qaeda terrorist Baghdad Meziane. He was convicted in a British court of raising money for the terrorist organisation and sentenced to 11 years in prison. At his trial, the judge recommended that after serving his sentence he should be deported. Yet, after being released from prison five years early, he went back to life in his adopted home town of Leicester rather than being put on the first plane to Algiers. He argued, successfully, that deportation would infringe his human rights.

The list goes on. Earlier this year, an Iraqi-born serial child sex offender won the right to stay in Scotland despite having assaulted three 14-year-old girls in a swimming pool.

Former Home Secretary Jacqui Smith served him with a deportation order, but he launched a taxpayer-funded appeal and — guess what — the Home Office allowed him to stay because the crimes against him were not sufficiently serious to throw him out.

This is the same Home Office that has so relentlessly pursued the Zielsdorf and Brain families, whose only wish was to do their part in performing a service for us — answering a government call to help the depopulated Highlands.

Both families came to the UK from distant parts of Britain’s global family. Both were encouraged to do so and both settled in a part of the country where new blood was vitally needed.

For Jason Zielsdorf, the decision to uproot his family from Calgary in Canada to rural Inverness-shire was about reconnecting with his cultural heritage and his Scottish family roots.

‘To Canadians, Scotland has always had the stronger pull than England,’ he says.

His ancestors left these shores after the last Highland clearances in the early 19th century.

He had a place studying the theological interpretation of scripture at St Andrews University, where Prince William and the Duchess of Cambridge were students.

After graduating, he and Christy decided to stay. In Laggan, 40 miles from Fort William, they thought they had found their idyll. The village shop had recently closed. They took it on and decided to make it their life’s work.

The only shop for 30 miles, it serves a scattered population of 300. ‘It had been vacant for 18 months and there was a need to invest in the shop to help sustain the community,’ Jason says.

To the general store they added a cafe to serve tourists as well as locals. Besides Christy’s bread, there is homemade soup and freshly made ice cream. In time they turned the upstairs of the shop into a guest room for travellers to stay.



All this was done on the entrepreneur’s visa they had applied for.


Soon they were putting down other roots. Their youngest son Kiernach, five, was born there, 15-year-old Lochlan was in the local shinty team, Christy was giving piano lessons and the couple began running the village newsletter.

Over the past two years they have invested everything in their adopted home, including spending £200,000 on buying their business and carrying out renovations.

But with the work on the shop taking longer than expected, the couple failed to meet all the criteria required for their visa.
‘We did our best, but we couldn’t make enough to employ two people. The only way of going forward with our case was to beg asylum under human rights law, but that would cost us £40,000 and ten years. We can’t do it.’

After briefly employing a string of £300-an-hour lawyers, they simply cannot afford to fight on. They did not qualify for legal aid. A petition signed by many of their customers and letters from other parts of the country were ignored, Jason says, because they were submitted ‘on the wrong form’. He says: ‘The Home Office may be right legally, but morally they are wrong.’

So the family are reconciled to leaving. ‘It will cost me £9,000 for a container from Pickfords to remove our belongings,’ says Jason, who is sleeping on the floor after selling his bed ahead of the departure.

‘Until we can sell we don’t have the money. If I mothball this place it will lose 25 per cent of its value.’

H e adds: ‘My future — my children’s future — is all in this business. When I go I won’t be allowed back into the country for 12 months. The longer I overstay, the longer it will be before I am allowed back. How can I sell my business from thousands of miles away?

‘If they physically remove me, it will be ten years before I can come back. We are shattered and beleaguered.’

As for the Brain family, they first came to the UK in 2001, spending their tenth wedding anniversary motoring around Scotland. Another trip in 2005 cemented their love of the Highlands, the birthplace of their great-grandparents.

But it was the promise of a post-study work visa that convinced them to take the plunge. A £40 million ‘homecoming’ PR campaign by the Scottish government reinforced their decision. They swapped Brisbane for Dingwall in Ross-shire and, like the Zielsdorfs, embraced local culture.

Lachlan took Gaelic lessons and Mrs Brain studied Scottish history and archaeology at the University of the Islands & Highlands. Mr Brain worked as a legal receptionist. But less than a year into their move, the immigration rules changed and the post-work study scheme was cancelled.

‘We were encouraged to come over here by a Home Office programme,’ he says. ‘That deal was changed after we had sold our house and everything we owned in Australia and moved across the world to settle here.

‘We’ve done our part, we have become members of the community. The Home Office has not lived up to its end of the bargain.

‘I accept the UK is entitled to set its own immigration policy, but having offered a pathway to us, to rip it up is a betrayal of natural justice. We have been offered jobs but we cannot work. We are marooned.’

Jason Zielsdorf has one last hope. ‘I am thinking of appealing to the Queen. As Canadians, we are her subjects, too.’

If there was any justice in a mad world where the values of decency and common sense are turned on their heads, government — not the Queen — would help these two families. Meanwhile, a one-legged Albanian killer literally gets away with murder and laughs in the face of Britain’s judges and politicians.

Comment:

Frankly, I don't blame Barci from laughing at the British government.  They are literally giving him a free ride because of his missing a leg.  Plus the government doesn't like to deport people if they know they will be executed when they get home.  The EU is anti-capital punishment.

This is another case of us getting what we deserve:  A country taken over by non-Whites - many of whom are criminals.

What makes matters worse, is we are not only allowing it, but even encouraging it.

Until we're willing to do what is necessary to stop this, we have no one to blame but ourselves.  We are literally assisting the enemy in our own extermination.  

Isn't that what they say the Jews did in WW II?

Dan 88!

No comments:

Post a Comment